All Posts Blog: Photo of the Week
All Posts Author: Arlington National Cemetery

Photo of the Week: October 28, 2013

Oct 28 2013
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Photo of the Week: October 28, 2013

A beautiful Amelanchier near Columbarium Court 8 at Arlington National Cemetery. The yellow, orange and red leaves against the blue October sky signals that autumn has arrived just in time for the Nov. 1, 2013 walking tour by Arlington’s horticulture program. Amelanchier is a genus of about 20 species of deciduous-leaved shrubs and small trees in the Rose family (Rosaceae).

Photo by Kelly D. Wilson, Arlington National Cemetery

Photo of the Week: October 21, 2013

Oct 21 2013
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Photo of the Week: October 21, 2013

Thirty years ago this week on Oct. 23, 1983, U.S. Marine Corps barracks in Beirut, Lebanon were bombed killing 241 American service members - 220 Marines, 18 Sailors and three Soldiers. Two truck bombs, detonated by suicide bombers, struck separate buildings housing United States and French military members of the Multinational Force in Lebanon killing a total of 299 American and French servicemen. The memorial is located in section 59 of Arlington National Cemetery where some of the service members who died in the attack are buried. 
U.S. Army Photo

Photo of the Week: October 14, 2013

Oct 14 2013
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Photo of the Week: October 14, 2013

In this photo, President Woodrow Wilson places the cornerstone of the Memorial Amphitheater Oct. 13, 1915. The Memorial Amphitheater was the dream of Judge Ivory G. Kimball, who wanted to have a place to assemble and honor America’s service members but he did not live to see his dream fulfilled. Kimball died May 15, 1916, and was buried in Section 3 of the cemetery, near the Amphitheater. The Memorial Amphitheater was dedicated May 15, 1920. Click here to read more about the Memorial Amphitheater. US Army Photo

Photo of the Week: October 07, 2013

Oct 07 2013
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Photo of the Week: October 07, 2013

Steve Van Hoven, chief of Arlington National Cemetery's horticulture division and master arborist, installs the new tree label on the cemetery's Yellowwood State Champion Tree in section 23. Van Hoven and Kelly Wilson, Arlington's horticulturist, installed the labels on all three of Arlington's state champions, a major step in officially establishing Arlington as a "Memorial Arboretum." Over the next several weeks, the cemetery will be installing a total of 297 labels on notable trees throughout the cemetery, including its 36 historic trees to commemorate Medal of Honor recipients, and other specimens along highly-visited routes. The labels include the tree's latin and common names, family name, and the native range of the tree.

Photo by Melissa Bohan, Arlington National Cemetery

Photo of the Week: September 30, 2013

Sep 30 2013
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Photo of the Week: September 30, 2013

The Old Guard at the Tomb of the Unknowns

Arlington National Cemetery Horticulturist Kelly Wilson captured this photo Sept. 30, 2013 of the sun rising over the Tomb of the Unknowns with the tomb guard pausing for 21 seconds before turning and repeating his 21- step march. Beginning Oct. 1, the tomb guard sentinels return to their winter schedule, which coincides with the winter hours for the cemetery. From Oct. 1 to March 31, visitors can see the guard change at the top of the hour from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. daily. 

Photo by Kelly D. Wilson, Arlington National Cemetery

Photo of the Week: September 23, 2013

Sep 23 2013
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Photo of the Week: September 23, 2013

 

Jason Greenleaf (left), Dan Frye (center) and Steve Sawyer of Arlington's Facilities Maintenance Division, level a fencing post as they prepare to pour cement at the base. The post is one of 135 new safety posts that the cemetery is installing along Sheridan Drive. The posts hold iron chains that provide a barrier from the high curve in the road, providing a safer passage for pedestrians and drivers.

Photo By Melissa Bohan, Arlington National Cemetery.

 

Photo of the Week: September 16, 2013

Sep 16 2013
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Photo of the Week: September 16, 2013

 

Rosemary Rednour adds gold leafing to some of the relief features of the "Price of Freedom" sculpture that adorns the east entrance of the cemetery's Welcome Center. The monument requires periodic maintenance, including adding gold leaf to areas that become subdued over time.

Greg Wyatt, the sculptor-in-residence for the Cathedral of Saint John the Divine in New York City, completed the monument over an eight year period. It is a tribute to those who fought and helped the homefront during World War II. It stands 12-feet high and weighs 1,800 pounds. Last December, the sculpture was moved from inside the Welcome Center to its permanent exterior location.

The sculpture includes a guardian angel cradling a dying unknown Soldier, a globe featuring the World War II theater, and seven bronze figures at the top representing those who played a key role in the war: five men representing the armed forces, a nurse, and "Rosie the Riveter". Twenty plaques adorn the bottom of the sculpture, listing what many historians consider to be the 20 most decisive battles during the war.

Photo by Melissa Bohan, Arlington National Cemetery

Photo of the Week: September 09, 2013

Sep 09 2013
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Photo of the Week: September 09, 2013

The 9-11 Memorial at Arlington National Cemetery

A five-sided granite marker in section 64 at Arlington National Cemetery is the headstone at the group burial site of the 184 victims of the September 11, 2001 attack on the Pentagon. The names of all those that perished in the Pentagon and on American Airlines Flight 77 are on the five panels of the marker. When standing at the gravesite, the Pentagon can be seen in the distance. 

Photo by Melissa Bohan, Arlington National Cemetery

Photo of the Week: September 02, 2013

Sep 02 2013
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Photo of the Week: September 02, 2013

After Arlington National Cemetery was established in 1864, the grounds were enclosed. Several gates provided pedestrian and vehicular access. The main entrance to the cemetery was located at the McClellan arch (pictured here) named in honor of Gen. George McClellan. One of the inscriptions on the McClellan Gate is from a poem by Theodore O’Hara, poet and U.S. Army officer in the Mexican-American War and Civil War: 

"On fame's eternal camping ground
their silent tents are spread,
And glory guards with solemn round,
the bivouac of the dead."

Inscribed on one of the columns is the name “Meigs” for Gen. Montgomery Meigs who established Arlington as a national cemetery. 

Photo by Melissa Bohan, Arlington National Cemetery

Photo of the Week: August 26, 2013

Aug 26 2013
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Photo of the Week: August 26, 2013

This week in history, the Second Battle of Bull Run (or Second Manassas) was fought August 28–30, 1862. Near the Arlington House stands a monument dedicated to the unknown soldiers who died in the Civil War. The monument, dedicated in September 1866, contains the remains of 2,111 soldiers gathered from the fields of Bull Run and the route to the Rappahannock.